Wait for it

I was thrust out of sleep last night for a few brief seconds into total free fall, just barely this side of consciousness, unable to recall where I was, who I was, why I was. For a moment I struggled to orient myself in space and time, until I heard myself say in a calm, competent voice: "Wait for it." A total sense of trust washed over me, a sense of excitement even (who might I be?) until finally I slammed back hard into the labels and perceptions of me.

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12% of a plan
Photo by Michael Voroshnin

12% of a plan

Recently I've felt the need for a more specific vision around early adulthood. The countdown to adulthood begins early for kids who need lots of time to learn and prepare. It's time to make tough choices about skills and goals. Where should he spend his time and effort? Is it important that he learns to read, or is it a better use of his time to go the store where he can practice social greetings, handling money, and navigating his neighborhood? This kind of parenting isn't for the faint-hearted.

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More kitchen table talk
Photo by NeONBRAND

More kitchen table talk

So last night my 10-year-old child and I were sitting at the kitchen table filling out back-to-school paperwork, and they mentioned that they had had a dream in which their older brother didn't have Coffin-Lowry Syndrome. They proceeded to tell me of the zany antics that can only ensue in a dream world. I've had a couple of dreams too in which he is neurotypical and I have woken up feeling shaken.

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Look Ma, no hands!
Photo by Flo Karr

Look Ma, no hands!

I have been riding with no hands when it comes to special needs parenting for some time now, ever since our huge move has had my attention elsewhere--getting a job, a place to live, a dog, converting recipes into metrics and Celsius. With so much to take in, I took my hands off the handlebars, trusting that the people around me would keep us safe (a correct hunch), that my mom detectors would sound even if 99% of me was caught up with figuring out the recycling rules of my new homeland, that I would take the handlebars again when it was time.

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SBAR

When you are parenting a child with special needs, learning how to communicate clearly with teachers, doctors and other professionals is a critical tool. Good communication helps the person we're trying to talk to understand all of the facts of the situation as well as what we need them to do. It's not that they don't care about us or want to rush us, but sometimes too much information makes it hard for them to know how to help.

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